The powerful mythology has grown up around the monastery at Tengboche as result of the writings of explores & mountaineers, but the Gompa is not as ancient as you might expect. The first Gompa at Tengboche was constructed in 1916 by Lama Gulu, a monk from Khumjung, but the building was destroyed in the earthquake of 1934, which also killed its founder.A second gompa on the site lasted until 1989, when an electrical fire burned the stone and timber structure to the ground. Tengboche was painstakingly reconstructed, opening its doors in 1993. Inside is a 4m high statue of Sakyamuni, backed by an ornate wooden freeze of mythical beasts that was rescued from the fire. In the doorway to the monastery, note the stone with a foot-shaped imprint, allegedly left by Lama Sange Dorje as he flew around the Himalaya in the 17th century.

The monastery is the setting for the famous Mani Rimdu festival in the ninth Tibetan month with whirling masked chaam dances & plenty of eating, drinking & making merry. Visitors are welcome to attend the daily prayer ceremonies at 6am & 3pm, but sit to the right so as not to interrupt the monks as they chant the scriptures. Wearing shoes or shorts, smoking & taking photo are all prohibited inside the monastery.

  • Although George Everest was head of the Survey if India form 1823 to 1843, he neither set foot near nor even saw the peak that honors his name.
  • The mountain was first explored by outsiders from the Tibetan side in 1921 after gaining permission to access it from the Dalai Lama. The mountain was first climbed in 1953 by Edmund Percival Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa. Two days prior to the monumental feat, a pair of British climber from the same team approached within 90 m/300 feet of the summit but turned back due to lack of oxygen supply. Hillary acknowledged that if the earlier duo had not broken trail and cached supplies, then he and Norgay likely would not have made the summit themselves.
  • The Swiss reached the summit the following year, and the mountain rested undistributed until 1963, when a US team climbed it by the West Ridge and came down the original route, the first traverse of the mountain.
  • 1965, Nawang Gombu Sherpa became the first to summit twice (first in 1963 with a US expedition and in 1965 with an Indian expedition).
  • Junko Tabei of Japan became the first female summiteer in 1975.
  • 1978 Reinhold Messner and Peter Haebeler summited without oxygen.
  • 1980 Yasuo Kato of Japan was the first non-Sherpa to reach the summit more than once (1973 was his first ascent). 1980 Messner summited solo and without oxygen. -1988 Jean-Marc Boivin paraglided from the summit to camp 2.
  • 1993, Pasang Lhamu Sherpa became the first Nepali female to summit Everest. She perished on the descent and posthumously has become a Nepali national heroine. A peak has been named in her honor as well as a statue in Kathmandu near Baudhnath. -1999, Babu Chiri Sherpa spent 21 hours on the summit without supplementary oxygen.
  • 2000, Davo Karnicar descended from the summit on skis.
  • 2001, Marco Siffredi snowboarded from the summit.
  • 2002, Erk Weihenmayer was the first blind summiteer. -2004, Pemba Dorje Sherpa made the fastest ascent (along the southern approach and with supplemental oxygen), in 8 hours and 10 minutes. -2005, Didier Delsalle landed a helicopter on the summit (not without controversy) setting records for both highest landing and takeoff.
  • 2008, Nepal’s Min Bahadur Sherchan became Nepal’s oldest summiteer at 76 (25 days shy of age 77).
  • 2012, Japan’ Tamae Watanabe, 73 years old became the oldest woman to climb Everest.
  • Sometimes referred to as an ‘Icy Graveyard,’ in the history of climbing on the peak to 2013, around 250 climbers have died including nearly 90 Sherpa. A majority of the corpses are still on the mountain!

Nepal aims to provide secondary health care each in the 75 district with hospitals staffed by physicians. Primary health care is provided by health posts scattered throughout each district.

The Himalayan Rescue association (HRA) reports that Nepal has over 150 helicopter evacuations annually. The cost Of Helicopter rescue is high nearly $ 3500 to $ 4000 per hours for trop rescue flight form Kathmandu to Annapurna, Everest, Langtang and other regions. Hence, you must have to prepare before upcoming destination in the mountain land. Make sure that the policy of your insurance company should cover the possess of giving you service of helicopter rescue from the mountain if needed incase of altitude sickness or others accident during your trip.

GENERAL

  • 4 Seasons sleeping bag (we can Provide but to Be returned after the trek).
  • Duffel bag (We will provide one compulsory duffel bag from Global Holidays Adventure).
  • Day pack , Down Jacket (we can provide but to be returned after the trek).
  • Upper body Head.
  • Shade hat or Baseball cap.
  • Warm woolen or synthetic hat to cover your ears.
  • Glacier glasses 100% UV protection .
  • Headlamp – make sure that bring extra batteries.
  • A neck warmer.

HAND

  • 1 pair liner gloves, thin wool or synthetic
  • 1 pair of warm gloves.
  • 1 pair shell gloves or mitts; Gore-Tex is preferred

CORE BODY

  • T-shirt 2/3
  • Light and expedition weight tops
  • Fleece Jacket
  • Fleece wind-stopper jacket.
  • Waterproof (Breathable fabric) shell jacket.

LOWER BODY

  • 2/3 pairs of nylon hiking shirt
  • Underwear, were always from cotton.
  • 1 pair soft shell pants.
  • 2 pairs trekking pants.
  • 1 pair hard shell pants (Gore-Tax is Best)
  • 1 pair cotton paints.

FEET

  • 4 pairs of liner socks.

CLIMBER GEAR

  • 1 Pair plastic shell Mountaineering boots.
  • 1 pair of steel crampons.
  • 1 Alpine climbing harness.
  • 1 Mountaineering axe with leash (sized properly for your height ).
  • 1 Ascender (as your appropriate ).
  • 2 D-Shaped locking carabineers.
  • 2 Non-locking carabineers.
  • 1 Pair expedition style gaiters (ensure fit over your boots).
  • Goggles.
  • Climbing helmet.

Altitude sickness and environment induced Health problems

The powerful mythology has grown up around the monastery at Tengboche as result of the writings of explores & mountaineers, but the Gompa is not as ancient as you might expect. The first Gompa at Tengboche was constructed in 1916 by Lama Gulu, a monk from Khumjung, but the building was destroyed in the earthquake of 1934, which also killed its founder.A second gompa on the site lasted until 1989, when an electrical fire burned the stone and timber structure to the ground. Tengboche was painstakingly reconstructed, opening its doors in 1993. Inside is a 4m high statue of Sakyamuni, backed by an ornate wooden freeze of mythical beasts that was rescued from the fire. In the doorway to the monastery, note the stone with a foot-shaped imprint, allegedly left by Lama Sange Dorje as he flew around the Himalaya in the 17th century.

The monastery is the setting for the famous Mani Rimdu festival in the ninth Tibetan month with whirling masked chaam dances & plenty of eating, drinking & making merry. Visitors are welcome to attend the daily prayer ceremonies at 6am & 3pm, but sit to the right so as not to interrupt the monks as they chant the scriptures. Wearing shoes or shorts, smoking & taking photo are all prohibited inside the monastery.

How to Prevent Altitude Sickness for Trekkers

Drink 5 Liters of Water Per Day
Quite simply, drink a minimum of five liters of water per day, no matter what. This is easier at lower elevations when it’s hot, but becomes more burdensome when temperatures cool off and you perspire less. After a few liters you may feel properly hydrated, but your body is doing extra work with less oxygen and needs the water. Force down five liters per day, without exceptions.

Avoid Dramatic Gains in Elevation
Treks at altitude should avoid big single-day gains in elevation (more than 1,500 vertical feet). A common misconception about trekking at high altitude is that physical condition dictates the body’s ability to fend off altitude sickness. This causes many people who are “in good shape” to ignore the rules of acclimatization, go too high too fast, and have problems. Your itinerary should factor in altitude gains and consequently some hiking days will end early. Embrace the pace, rest your legs, and hydrate.

Climb High, Sleep Low
You will acclimatize better if you expose yourself to higher altitudes but return to a lower altitude to sleep. After setting up camp, scramble up a nearby hill, scope out the scenery, and head back down for a better night’s rest. When you have a rest day, use the opportunity to hike to higher elevations and back down—even a few hundred vertical feet is worth the effort. At higher altitudes—around 10,000 feet and above—this rule becomes even more important as your body is learning to cope with considerably less oxygen.

Eat, Eat, Eat
Your body is doing more work than usual so make sure to stay nourished and full of carbohydrates. For a dependable snack, Nepal has embraced the Snickers bar wholeheartedly and it can be found even in the tiniest villages (and for very cheap). Too much sugar, yes, but full of good things like nuts and chocolate. Do a good deed and buy some for your porters and guide whenever possible.

Listen to Your Body
By following the above rules, you will greatly increase your odds of staying healthy throughout your trek, but everybody reacts differently to altitude so pay close attention to how you feel. Every trek should have rest days built in and you shouldn’t be afraid to use them. Stay hydrated, wear sunscreen, and have layers available for protection from the powerful sun. Avoid alcohol and other substances. Monitor yourself and always communicate any health concerns to your group. An estimated 75% of people feel some affects of altitude, mostly in the form of headaches, nausea, fatigue, and trouble sleeping. These are actually mild manifestations of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). Mild AMS should not interfere with normal activity and the symptoms should subside as acclimatization occurs. As long as the symptoms are mild, it’s generally okay to continue hiking up at a moderate rate. If feeling poorly persists or worsens, turn around.

Medications for Altitude Sickness
The only treatment for altitude sickness is descent, but medication can help with the symptoms. Consult a doctor before use. Ibuprofen can be used to treat the symptoms of mild altitude sickness such as headaches and nausea.
Diamox (Acetazolamide) is a respiratory stimulant that helps the body metabolize more oxygen, especially at night, thereby accelerating the process of acclimatization. Diamox can be used as a prophylactic, particularly by those making unavoidably large ascents.

Severe Problems
In severe cases altitude sickness can be truly life-threatening. If a trekker ever gets an unusual or severe headache, or feels unusually short of breath, they should immediately descend 2,000 feet (600 meters), no matter the time of day. High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE), excess fluid in the lungs, and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE), swelling of the brain, are rare but life threatening conditions that require immediate descent and medical attention.

Tourists in Kathmandu and Pokhara can choose from the full range of accommodations and services from bare minimum to five-star. Out on the trails travelers have a variety of choices from camping with a retinues of porters, cooks and guides to camping on one’s own at “billion star hotel”. Otherwise select from simple lodges to well furnished hotels, or try home stay with local residents for a unique experience. Nepal Travel has accommodation and possibilities for every tourist.

Depending on your style there is something available for every budget in Nepal. The Main tourist centers of Kathmandu Pokhara and Chitwan have everything up to first class accommodation during your visit.

Nepal’s popular trekking routes offer a wide range of accommodation, typically surrounding by majestic natural scenery. Away from the tourist highways, foreigners in rural areas are few and far between and if not camping or staying in simple lodges, then home stay accommodation will have to be arranged, a recommended option in this welcoming country for getting to know your hosts and More of Nepal’s cultural treasures !

In Everest trekking most of the routes are available Tea houses. Everest Base camp, Gkyo lake,3 High passes have well facilities of local lodges. They Provide twin sharing accommodation. During the top trekking seasons the lodges busy in this area. Most of the owners of the lodges are Sherpa. While on camping route we you will be provided all meals in tent camp.

Introduction
Nepal is the Youngest republic in the world. The people’s movement in June 2006 overthrew centuries- Old Shah Dynasty and declared Nepal as a Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal on May 28,2008.

Location
Nepal is a small and beautiful landlocked country, 800 km long and 200 km wide. In the longitudinal 200 km, the terrain changes from glaciers of the Tibetan border to the flat jungles of the Terai, barely 150m above sea level.The country does not ascend gradually from the plains.

Language
Nepali is the national language of Nepal. However, people in urban areas speak and understand English quite well. People in the tourism industry also speak and understand selected international languages like Chinese, Indian,French,Japanese, German, Spanish and many more. Apart from these, there are hundreds of local dialects spoken by people from various ethnic groups.

Climate
Nepal has four distinct seasons, spring, from March to May, is warm and dusty with rain showers. Summer is from June to August, and much of this season is dominated by the monsoon, when the hills turn lush and green. Autumn, from late september to November, is cool with clear skies, and is the most popular trekking season. In winter, from December to February, it is cold at night and can be foggy in the early morning, but afternoons are usually clear and pleasant,though there is occasional snow in the mountains.

People & Religion
Nepal is a secular state and it respects the practice and existence of different religion within its territory. Nepalese people are mainly divided into two distinct groups; the Indo- Aryans and the Mongoloids (the kirants). The Hindu temples and Buddhist Shrines are scattered all over the country. Nepal is the birthplace of Lord Buddha, the Herald of peace. Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims,Christians and people of other religion live together here in perfect harmony.

Currency & foreign exchange
Nepal bank notes comes in rupees 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000 Denominations. Coins come in rupees 1, 2, 5, 10 denominations. Foreign currencies must be exchange only through banks or authorized money exchange. The receipt of such tranctions are to be obtained and retained. Visitors can exchange foreign currency at the foreign exchange counter at the airport upon arrival too. Visitors other than the Indian nationals have to make the payment in foreign curreny (non-Indian currency) in hotel, trekking agencies or travel agencies and for air tickets.

Political System
Nepal has been declared as a Federal Democractic Republic by the first meeting of Constituent assembly on May 28, 2008. Nepal practices multi-party system of democracy with president as the head of State and the prime minister enjoying executive power. Through Nepal has been declared a federal republic, the democration of federal states is yet to be done.

Mountains
Nepal is a mountainous country and the major of the world famous Himalayan range lies in Nepal. Neapal is home ot eight of the fourteen 8,000 meters peaks including the Mt. Everest. Other 8000 meters peaks in Nepal are Kanchanjunga, Cho-oyu, Makalu, Manaslu, Annapurna, Dhaulagiri and Lhotse. Apart from these mountains, Neapl is home to hundreds of other beautiful and challenging peaks in the lakes of Amadablam, Island, Mera, Ganesh Himal, Gauri Sankar and others. Government of Nepal has opened 326 peaks for mountaineering and expeditions.

Vistor’s Trend
Nepal receives foreign visitors in the tune of five lakhs every year. The arrival figure in the country in 2007 crossed five lakhs for the first time. Most of the visitors come to Nepal for holiday or pleasure activities and to involve in trekking. Significant number of visitors come for pilgrimage,official and business purpose. Apart from Kathmandu valley. Lumbini and different trekking areas of the country including the Everest, Annapurna and Langtang regions.

Culture & Traditions
Nepal is country rich in ancient culture and traditions.Nepal is home to over 60 ethnic groups and indigenous nationalities that have their distinct attire,culture,tradition and lifestyle. These communities speak more than 100 local dialects making Nepal a country of great culture and ethical diversities. People of Nepal calendar when colorful festivals are not celebrated. various temples,monasteries and places of religious significance are found everywhere in Nepal.

Topography
Nepal is a country of great topographical diversities. The altitude in the country varies from less than 70 m above sea level at Kechana Kalan of Jhapa to the world’s highest point 8,848 meters at the summit of Mt. Everest. This variation occurs at the distance of less than 300 kms. Nepal is divided into three different regions as per altitude variations mountain, hills and Terai.

Biological Diversity
Despite being a small country, Nepal has a great biological diversity. Nepal has gazetted different national parks and conversations areas to protect bio-diversity in those areas. Nepal is home to 167 species of mammals, 50 amphibian and 130 reptiles, 863 birds and more than 6000 species of plants among which about 245 species of plant are only found in Nepal. A total of 118 ecosystem,75 vegetation and 35 forest types have been identified so far. Endangered animal species like Royal Bengal Tiger, One-horned Rhino, Red Panda and others are preserved in different protected areas of Nepal.

Tourist Police was established in 1979 under the Miinistry of Culture,Tourism and Civil Aviation. The special unit has been designated the task of providing security to visitors. The team of Tourist Police conists of officers who can speak and understand English and Hindi. They register complaints,investigate matters,provide protection and saftey to tourists. They also try to ensure hassle-free trip for visitors and assit tourists when necessary. There are three units of Tourist Police forces in Kathmandu. While the main office is at the Tourist service Center in Bhrikuti Mandap (phone: 4247041,4247037),the other two are in tourist areas Thamel (phone: 4429750) and Basantapur (Phone: 4268969).

Here are some tips on how visitors can remain safe:

  1. Inform you whereabouts immediately upon arrival to the local police or concerned embassy or consulate.
  2. Use the services of government registered travel and trekking agencies only.
  3. Stay only at government registered hotels, resorts,guesthouse and lodges.
  4. Use only those porters who are authorized by your travel agency ot hotel.
  5. Exchange foreign currency only at authorized places.
  6. Never carry your wallet in the back pocket.
  7. Make sure your wallet is in the inside jacket pocket or side pocket of the trousers.
  8. Carry certified copies of documents and leave the originals and other valuables in the safe deposit box of your hotel.
  9. Never leave these itmes unattended in your room and do not carry large sums of cash.
  10. Carry traveler’s cheque and limited amount of cash while on tour .
  11. Never leave your luggage and other valuables unattended at any time, any place. In case of theft or loss contact the nearest police station immediately.
  1. The purpose of our safety guidelines is to make your peace of mind. Nepal has been very safe destination for any foreigners. That is why many foreigners visit this country again and again. As far as you concern the news from different international Medias they show you only political upheavals in Nepal but in reality you would find much better situation than perceive.
  2. We recommend you to go through our following safety guidelines and stay tune with latest happening.
  3. The unique culture of Nepal is that the guests/tourists regarded as a God; that’s why you will receive great hospitality in Nepal as many foreigners praise about this tradition. This proves that you will remain safe and treated well in Nepal.
  4. Always find a reliable travel/trekking agency to travel in Nepal. For trekking always choose a registered responsible trekking agency. Never go alone for trekking. Always take a company of a guide.
  5. Learn about travel health,safety and travel insurance
  6. Inform yourself on the climate, temperature and environment of Nepal. It is also important to know about the diverse geographical nature of Nepal.
  7. Make sure you have comprehensive travel insurance, before you leave. to cover baggage,flight cancellation and emergency medical care. Bear in mind that basic policies will not cover winter or extreme sports activities.
  8. For long stays in Nepal get yourself registered with your country’s consulate or embassy.
  9. Speak to other travelers,locals or tourist information offices about which areas are safe to visit and places to avoid. There are some high passes trekking in Nepal in which normal trekker cannot go easily.
  10. Preferably do not leave any valuables out in the open as temptation induces crime.Keep your passport,money and other important belongings in a secure place at all times. All the hotels provide safe to keep your valuables until you return from trekking.
  11. Avoid wearing expensive jewelry while traveling and keep your money belt out sight. However,theft and crime is not big problem in Nepal particularly for tourist.
  12. Do not carry too much in cash as far as possible. Make use of your credit cards instead.
  13. Don’t keep all your money in one place and make sure you have noted the numbers of your traveler’s cheques so they can be replaced if they are stolen.
  14. Drug-abuse,trafficking and sexual relations with children are strictly prohibited. Read and understand the terms and conditions of trekking/travel agency that you agreed. Ask every health related information that required for the activities that you are interested on. For any emergency while trekking do not hesitate to contact to your travel agency. They are always ready for your help.

In Kathmandu and Pokhara, and even some trail heads like Beni, Lukla and Besi Sahar, you can change money officially at banks,hotel exchange counters and money changers authorized by the Nepal Rastra Bank. Himalayan Bank is the most convenient place to change rate in larger hotels is often unfavorable.

There are also numerous licensed money changers in Pokhara, Kathamndu and a few trekking villages. These facilities are more convenient and efficient than banks but,despite their signs advertising ‘no commission’. they offer rates slightly below what the banks give.you can change both cash and travelers cheques in Nepal.US dollars are the most acceptable.

ATMs
Kathmandu and Pokhara have dozens of ATMs. Standard Chartered Bank machines are perhaps the most reliable,though Himalayan Bank and Nabil Bank ATMs also accept international cards. There are even functioning ATMs in Jomsom and Namche Bazaar. Frequent power outages limit the machines working hours, so use one when you see it’s working. Using an ATM attached to a bank during business hours will minimise the hassle in the rare event that the machine eats your card.

Credit Cards
major credit cards are widely accepted at midrange and better hotels,restaurants and fancy shops in the kathmandu valley and Pokhara only. Most places levy a 3% to 4% surcharge to counter the credit-card company’s fees to the vendor.Branches of Standard Chartered Bank,Nabil Bank and Himalayan Bank give cash advances against Visa and Mastercard in Nepali rupees only (no commission).